~ CLOSED ~ How to Easily Read the Nutrition Facts Table {w/$100 GC Giveaway}

We’ve all seen them. They’re found on pre-packaged foods in the grocery store and on boxes and bags located on your pantry shelves. They are white rectangles with black edges and they full of information on the foods you have purchased or are considering purchasing.

Have you guessed what I’m talking about? I bet many of you already know, I’m referring to the Nutrition Facts table (NFt).

Many of us have seen the NFt on packages, but, do we all know how to properly read it?

FIRST, you need to know where you will find the Nutrition Facts table.

Almost all pre-packaged foods have a Nutrition Facts table. It looks the same on most foods. This is by design and makes it easy to find and easy to read.

Not all foods need to have a Nutrition Facts table. The following foods are not required to have a Nutrition Facts table:

  • Fresh vegetables and fruits
  • Raw meat and poultry (except when it is ground)
  • Raw fish and seafood
  • Foods prepared or processed at the store (bakery items, salads, etc)
  • Foods that contain very few nutrients such as coffee, tea, herbs and spices
  • Alcoholic beverages

Nutrition Facts

These are the Nutrition Facts tables that I am referring to. See…they’re not scary at all and in no time, I’m talking minutes, not hours or days, you will be an expert in reading them!

Here we go, all we need to do is FOCUS ON THE FACTS

The Nutrition Facts table gives you information on the amount of 13 core nutrients and calories in an amount of food. Use this information and the % Daily Value (% DV) to choose and compare food products for a healthier you. Reading the ingredient list can also help you make better food choices.

That paragraph above may sound intimidating, but it’s not. Honestly, it is so easy to learn that it’s a great little task to teach your kids, they love searching for product information and figuring out if a potential purchase is a healthy choice.

WHAT IS INCLUDED IN A NUTRITION FACTS TABLE?

A nutrition facts table gives you information on:

  • serving size
  • calories
  • % DV

Next, I’m going to break it down into a couple of simple and easy steps.

You will want to START with SERVING SIZE.

  • You can find the Serving Size under the header ‘Nutrition Facts’.
  • Information in the Nutrition Facts table is based on this quantity of food.

Nutrition Facts

The SECOND part to look at is CALORIES

A calorie is a unit of energy. When you hear something has 100 calories, it’s a way of describing how much energy your body could get from eating or drinking it.

Calories aren’t bad for you. Your body needs calories for energy. But eating too many calories and not burning enough of them off through activity can lead to weight gain.

Average daily caloric intake is based on age, sex and physical activity level.  For Males 18+ it is about 2200-2800 calories and Females 18+ it is about 1800-2200 calories.

Nutrition Facts

NEXT is % Daily Value (% DV).

You can find the % Daily Value on the right side of the Nutrition Facts table.

Nutrition Facts

Use % DV to see if a Serving Size has a little or a lot of nutrients.

  • 5% DV or less is a little
  • 15% DV or more is a lot

Nutrition Facts

  • Choose packaged food that has more of the nutrients you want, like fibre and calcium and less of those you don’t want, like trans fats and sodium.
  • Use can also use % DV to compare packaged food.

LAST STEP

Determine if this food is a nutritious choice –

Use the % DV to see if the Serving Size has a little or a lot of a nutrient so you can make a better choice for you and your family. Remember, 5% DV or less is a little and 15% or more is a lot.

Nutrition Facts

In this photo, I am looking at the Nutrition Facts table to see if this product is a nutritious choice for our family.  I determined that Cereal B, was indeed a healthy choice.

You can use the Nutrition Facts table to:

  • Choose products more easily.
  • Compare two products to make better food choices for you and your family.
  • Learn about the nutrition information of the foods you eat.
  • Better manage special diets.
  • Increase or decrease your intake of any nutrient.

Taking a few minutes to familiarize yourself and to also help your children understand the Nutrition Facts table is well worth the time invested.

Making healthy food choices can help reduce your risk of nutrition-related chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

To learn more about the Nutrition Facts Education Campaign: “Focus on the Facts” and to keep up to date with all that is happening, be sure to visit Government of Canada – Nutrition Facts.

 

~ GIVEAWAY ~

(PLEASE NOTE quick turnaround. This giveaway closes at 11:59PM on March 31, 2016)

PRIZE  $100.00 Grocery Gift Card (Participating retailers for the grocery gift card are:  Loblaws, Overwaitea, Metro, Sobey’s, Costco, Walmart, Federated Coop)

DATES –  Giveaway closes at 11:59 PM on March 31st, 2016

ELIGIBILITY – Open to all residents of Canada, excluding Quebec.

TO ENTER – Using the Giveaway Tools form below, simply follow the instructions, complete the mandatory entry, (which unlocks the optional entries),  plus any or all the optional entries for your chance to win this prize!

Good luck everyone!

 

Comments

  1. Anne Taylor says:

    I learned that I have to pay more attention to serving sizes on labels!

  2. I learned that canned soup has A LOT of sodium.

  3. I learned that the serving size is not necessarily the amount you should eat

  4. Don’t forget to compare serving sizes instead of just looking at the label.

  5. I found it really informative. The article clarified the meaning of dv%.

  6. Wendy hutton says:

    I learned that it gives you information on 13 core nutrients

  7. Monique L.S. says:

    I learned that 5% Daily Value or less is a little and 15% Daily Value or more is a lot, and I want a lot of the good ingredients and a little of the not so good ingredients.

  8. I learnt how to properly compare labels to see which offers the best nutrition

  9. I learnt that I need to closely check the labels. I had no idea how to read them previously or what the figures meant.

  10. BobbiJo Pentney says:

    Look closely at the serving size, all is not always as it seems.

  11. I learned a lot and that I should not disregard the practice of reading labels when purchasing products to better manage the health of my family. Knowing how much nutrients is in a product and how I can take advantage of it.

  12. I learnt that I was reading labels wrong, such a huge eye opener..now that I’m educated there’s no more reason to eat healthier

  13. I learned about information on 13 nutrients

  14. Lillian Brown says:

    I learned that there are 13 core nutrients that must be listed in a nutrition facts table.

  15. I learned that there are 13 core nutrients that has be listed in a nutrition facts table

  16. I learned that it gives you information on 13 core nutrients

  17. Listing the % DV for cholesterol is optional.

  18. I learned that there are 13 core nutrients that must be listed in a nutrition fact table. I also learned that I need to start paying more attention to serving sizes.

  19. I learned that serving size in not the amount of food you are expected to eat. It is how much food was used to get the numbers on the nutrition label.

  20. Phyllis W. says:

    Never paid attention to the DV% before. Now I will be!

  21. caroline m. says:

    I learned how to compare foods using the nutrition facts table

  22. I learned that nutrition labels list serving size, calories and percent daily value.

  23. I’ve learned that there are 13 core nutrients that have to be listed in a nutrition facts table.
    missbobloblaw recently posted…#HolidayReady Twitter Party with @EchelonFoods #TurduckenMy Profile

  24. Amy Heffernan says:

    I learned they have a tool to compare foods nutritional values!

  25. Kim DeCoste says:

    I learned that I thought I knew exactly how to read the nutritional facts on the labels and realized there were things I didn’t know…the serving size was an eye opener for me.

  26. I learned about the DV (Daily Value) column and that 5% DV or less is a little and 15% DV or more is a lot for all nutrients in the Nutrition Facts table. Good to know!

  27. I learned that they include the 13 nutrients

  28. The %DV and serving size can help you choose which foods with the highest nutrients that you’re looking for.

  29. Elizabeth R says:

    I learned how to determine the serving size from the nutrition label.

  30. Robyn Bellefleur says:

    I learned that the serving size is not always the amount you should eat.

  31. Diana Powell says:

    I learned the importance of checking the serving size .Something I never did before.

  32. I learned that you have to check the serving size as well.

  33. Florence C says:

    I learned that the nutrition facts table shows information on the 13 core nutrients.

  34. Bailey Dexter says:

    I learned that on that page there is an “Interactive tool: how to compare” information page which I found quite interesting on how to compare foods.

  35. BlessedTA says:

    I learnt about how to choose food and nutrition values

  36. I learned to really look closely at the serving size, very helpful tips, thanks!

  37. I learned that Listing the % DV on cholesterol is optional.
    Michelle B recently posted…You’re Never Too Young for DisneyMy Profile

  38. I learned that serving size isn’t necessarily a meal size.

  39. i learned that a nutrition facts label has 13 core nutrients as well as some optional ones.

  40. Michelle Li says:
  41. I learned that Daily % is a really great way to quickly check out the nutritional value of a food!

  42. I learned how to read the % DV (Daily Value). 5% DV or less is a little and 15% DV or more is a lot for all nutrients in the Nutrition Facts table.

  43. I learned to check the serving size. Sometimes a regular “helping” might be more than one serving.

  44. Nate Fuller says:

    He nutritional info is based on a specific serving size which might not be very much!

  45. I learned how to compare labels based on serving size

  46. Sherry mofitt says:

    I learned how to read the nutrition facts tables and to watch serving sizes.

  47. Travelbuds says:

    I learnt than when comparing 2 kinds of bread to look at the sodium and fibre levels for both.

  48. Andrea Amy says:

    I learned that 5% Daily Value or less is a little and 15% Daily Value or more is a lot, and that I should always pay attention to serving size.

  49. I learned that you can compare similar packaged food by checking both the serving size and the % DV.

  50. I learned that there are 13 core nutrients that must be listed on a nutrition facts labels.

  51. kristen visser says:

    I learned to look at the serving size and checked out the Table of nutrient-content claims and what they mean

  52. I learned that there are some foods that do not have a nutrition facts table.

  53. I learned to make sure the serving sizes are the same when comparing different brands.

  54. Christine Holliday says:

    Pay attention to serving size…

  55. I learnes 15 % is a lot .

  56. Juliee Fitze says:

    I learnt to double check the serving size , so I don’t over do it on the carbs.

  57. Wayne Lecoy says:

    It would be great to win a $100 Grocery Gift Card.
    In response to your requirement to
    visit NUTRITION FACTS
    and tell you about something i learned.
    I learned how to read the nutrition facts tables and to watch serving sizes.
    Thank you for having this giveaway.

  58. Lynda Cook says:

    I learned that restaurants and food service businesses also do not need to provide a nutrition facts table with their products

  59. Darrah Bailey says:

    I learned that you Start with serving size!

  60. I learnt that there are 13 core nutrients that must be listed in a nutrition facts table

  61. Courtney says:

    I learned that you always start with serving size

  62. Cheryl Grandy says:

    I learned that 5% or less of a nutrient in a serving of food is considered a little and 15% or more is a lot.

  63. I learned that it gives you information on 13 core nutrients.
    I also learned that I should pay attention to the serving sizes
    and how to look for less salt and sugar content.This was really
    a good educational eye opener for me because my husband
    has diabetes and all of this information is really important.

  64. Julie Bolduc says:

    I learnt that I should look at the serving size as well as the daily %

  65. Debbie F says:

    I learned that the recommended serving size is not necessarily the amount you should eat

  66. Katarina Badrov says:

    I didn’t know about the high/low daily % value on the nutrients.

  67. Noting serving size is key when figuring out the percentages.

  68. Angela Mitchell says:

    I learned that there is a list of nutrients that are mandatory to include in the nutrition facts table but there is also a list of nutrients that are optional to include.

  69. Judy Cowan says:

    I learned that the serving size is not necessarily the amount you should eat.

  70. Krista M says:

    I learned that the NFt features information on 13 core nutrients, & that restaurants don’t need to provide NFt for their products.

  71. The serving size is not necessarily the amount you should eat

  72. Doreen Lamoureux says:

    I actually just learned the Read the % DV (Daily Value). 5% DV or less is a little and 15% DV or more is a lot for all nutrients in the Nutrition Facts table……… FINALLY.

  73. elizabeth miller says:

    I learned exactly how to decipher what is considered a lot or too little of a value. For example if it’s over 15 percent daily value it has a lot. If it’s less than 5 percent is has little.

  74. ivy pluchinsky says:

    I learned that the serving size is not necessarily the amount you should eat

  75. Serving size is not the amount you usually eat.

  76. I learned that you can use a nutrition facts table to compare the serving size to the amount of food you actually eat.
    Fan R recently posted…Unleash Your Inner Artist at Cocktails ‘n Canvas Events #cncMy Profile

  77. Rhonda W G. says:

    Always calculate on the serving you are actually going to eat! That has changed my opinion many times on whether to buy…lol.

  78. I learned that there are 13 core nutrients that must be listed in a nutrition facts table.

  79. SweetPanda says:

    I learned that if I choose to eat this frozen meal package, try to limit the amount of sodium you will eat from other foods during the day

  80. I learned they have a contest going on

  81. Elizabeth Matthiesen says:

    I learnt that Serving size is not necessarily the suggested quantity of food you should eat.

  82. Carol Denny says:

    Don’t forget to compare serving sizes instead of just looking at the label.

  83. Rosanne Robinson says:

    I learned that it gives you information on 13 core nutrients and the Serving size is not the suggested quantity of food that you should eat.

  84. Serving sizes aren’t the amount recommended to eat but rather just the amount used to calculate nutrients and calories.

  85. Jo-Ann Brightman says:

    I learned that you have to check the number of servings and multiply each ingredient to find the true amount of fat, sodium,etc.

  86. Belinda McNabb says:

    I have learned that cream soups are quite high in fat!

  87. Erica Seaman says:

    I learned that 5% DV or less is a little and 15% DV or more is a lot

  88. Carole Dube says:

    I learned that the serving size is not necessarily the amount you should eat

  89. Tammy Dalley says:

    I learned how to watch serving sizes

  90. Cheryl Almas says:

    I learned that the nutrition facts table shows information about the 13 core nutrients.

  91. Karry Knisley says:

    I learned how to determine the serving size from the nutrition label

  92. Sunshine G says:

    I learned that serving size and package size can be wildly different.

  93. Sunshine H says:

    I was surprised that the percentage of ‘Daily Value’ (15% or more) is considered a ‘lot’, and I learned that the figures are based on a 2000 calorie per day diet.

  94. You will not find a nutrition facts table on foods that contain very few nutrients, such as:

    coffee
    tea
    vinegar
    spices

  95. I learned there are 13 core nutrients listed.

  96. sara rai says:

    I learned there are 13 core nutrients that should be listed in a nutrition facts table.

  97. I learned how to compare products. I learned that the weights have to be the same to compare them.

  98. Donna L. says:

    I learned how to read the nutrition facts table so I can make healthy choices.

  99. Jamie Bertrand says:

    i learned what all the things on the label mean

  100. i learned how to properly compare nutrition values

  101. I learned how to proerly compare labels

  102. I never really thought about serving sizes, treats can get scary really fast!

  103. Debbie Bashford says:

    I learned that it gives you information on 13 core nutrients

  104. chris arnott says:

    portion size is very important for a healthy diet

  105. Judy Williams says:

    That serving sizes make it more difficult to compare nutrition labels and they are often smaller than we think (example what I consider a single serving is often two serving size)

  106. Leslie Crosbie says:

    Check serving size because you could eat multiple serving, which could be 2x, 3x more than you thought!

  107. Brandee H says:

    I learned about the importance of looking at the serving size.

  108. Melissa F says:

    I learned to look closer at the serving size and adjust %daily based on what you eat.

  109. Almost everything has too much sodium.

  110. There are 3 choices
    Step 1: Look at the Amount of food.
    Step 2: Read the % DV (Daily Value).
    Step 3:Make a better choice for you

  111. I learned on average canadians eat way too much salt! Must read labels!!

  112. nicolthepickle says:

    I learned that sometimes the serving size on the box isn’t the size you should eat. I had no idea.

  113. I learned that 13 core nutrients must be listed.
    Randa Derkson recently posted…Rainbow Swirl Buttercream FrostingMy Profile

  114. Cassie Fancy says:

    I learned to pay attention to serving sizes and not just the ingredients label

  115. I learned you really need to check the serving size when comparing products

  116. carol clark says:

    I learned that there are 13 core nutrients that must be listed in a nutrition facts table.

  117. need to check serving sizes to compare apples to apples!

  118. Debbie H. says:

    I learned how to choose a healthy yogurt

  119. Shelley Nelson says:

    that items with very few ingredients like coffee do not have a nutritional label -never realized that but it makes sense

  120. I learned that there are 13 core nutrients that must be listed in a nutrition facts table.

  121. lori butler says:

    paying attention to the actual serving size

  122. Scott MacMillan says:

    I learned to be very careful in ensuring that I eat in conjunction asthe serving size listed

  123. found it really informative.

  124. I learned that the serving size is not necessarily how much of it you should eat

  125. Natalie M. says:

    I learned to watch for serving sizes that have different weights – e.g. the weight of a chicken nugget

  126. I learned how to read about the serving size. Eye-opening!

  127. There are 13 core nutrients and the percentage of sugar.

  128. Learned that portion size is not a serving size!

  129. Serving size is not always what is best to eat.

  130. angela eagle says:

    that I have to pay more attention to serving sizes on labels!

  131. Karla Sceviour says:

    I learned that there are 13 core nutrients that must be listed in a nutrition facts table

  132. I learned to look at the serving size because you might think something (like sweets) have the facts for 1 serving=bag but often it is way more servings so the calories add up!

  133. Andrea Williams says:

    I learned that 5% DV or less is a little and 15% DV or more is a lot for all nutrients in the Nutrition Facts tables.

  134. Nicole Jubleew says:

    I learned that The % DV for a nutrient is calculated by: dividing the amount of a nutrient in a serving size by its daily value, then multiplying that number by 100

  135. I am able to Find information on food labels and how to understand them. Learn about nutrition facts tables, serving size, list of ingredients, % daily value and nutrition claims.

  136. Never even thought to compare serving size.

  137. Tricia Cooper says:

    I learned that the serving size is not necessarily the suggested quantity of food you should eat.

  138. Shannon Heitt says:

    I learned that serving size is very important

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