~ CLOSED ~ Become an Expert Nutrition Fact Finder ~ It’s Easy! {w/2 Contests}

It’s no secret that for the most part, we all strive to provide the best possible life for our family, especially our growing children. We do everything in our power to keep them safe, happy and healthy; that includes providing the best nutritional foods possible. But, how do we know what is good for our family and what is maybe, not so good? It’s easy, we become a Nutrition Fact  Finder!

Okay, I know right now you’re probably thinking, what the heck is a Nutrition Fact Finder?

I’m referring to some easy steps you can take to make yourself and your family experts at reading the Nutrition Facts table (NFt). The table is found on most packaged food products in Canada.

Nutrition Fact Finder

Above is an example of a Nutrition Facts table (NFt)

Most of us have probably seen the NFt.  This table is key to making a more informed food choice for you and your family.

It’s very easy to use, once you do it a couple of times, you will have no trouble at all. I’m talking minutes, not hours or days, to become an expert at reading them!

OVERVIEW ~ WHAT IS INCLUDED IN A NUTRITION FACTS TABLE (NFt)

A nutrition facts table gives you information on:

  • serving size
  • calories
  • % DV

Nutrition Fact Finder

Next, I’m going to break down how to use the NFt into three easy steps:

STEP #1

Start with the serving size –

  • Serving size can be found at the top of the nutrition facts table under the header “Nutrition Facts”.
  • Information in the Nutrition Facts table is based on this quantity of food.
  • Check to see if the Serving Sizes are similar when comparing packaged foods.
  • You can also use a nutrition facts table to compare the serving size to the amount of food you actually eat.
    •  For example, the serving size of bread in a nutrition facts table could be 1 slice. But if you eat 2 slices, you need to double the number of calories and nutrients.

Nutrition Fact Finder

Then, look at the calories –

A calorie is a unit of energy. When you hear something has 100 calories, it’s a way of describing how much energy your body could get from eating or drinking it.

Calories aren’t bad for you. Your body needs calories for energy. But eating too many calories and not burning enough of them off through activity can lead to weight gain.

Average daily caloric intake is based on age, sex, and physical activity level.  For Males 18+ it is about 2200-2800 calories and Females 18+ it is about 1800-2200 calories.

Nutrition Fact Finder

STEP #2

Look at Percent Daily Value (% DV) on the right side of the NFt – 

Nutrition Fact Finder

  • Use % Daily Value (%DV) to see if a Serving Size has a little or a lot of nutrients.
    • 5% DV or less is a little
    • 15% DV or more is a lot

Nutrition Fact Finder

  • Choose packaged food that has more of the nutrients you want, like fibre and calcium and less of those you don’t want, like trans fats and sodium.
  • Use can also use % DV to compare packaged food.

Nutrition Fact Finder

STEP #3

Determine if this food is a nutritious choice –

Use the % DV to see if the Serving Size has a little or a lot of a nutrient so you can make a better choice for you and your family. Remember, 5% DV or less is a little and 15% or more is a lot.

Nutrition Fact Finder

In this photo, I am looking at the Nutrition Facts table to see if this product is a nutritious choice for our family.

Remember, you can use the Nutrition Facts table to:

  • Choose products more easily.
  • Compare two products to make better food choices for you and your family.
  • Learn about the nutrition information of the foods you eat.
  • Better manage special diets.
  • Increase or decrease your intake of any nutrient.

I love using the Nutrition Facts table as it gives me information on the 13 core nutrients and calories in an amount of food.  I can then use this information and the % Daily Value (% DV) to choose and compare food products and make healthier choices.

You can learn even more about becoming an expert “Nutrition Fact Finder” by visiting Canada.ca/NutritionFacts and following the hashtag #FocusontheFacts  

CONTESTS

Using the Giveaway Tools form below, enter for your chance to win a $100.00 Sobeys Gift Card.

 Finally, don’t forget to head over to Focus on the Facts, test your knowledge daily and enter for a chance to win one of seven, $300 grocery gift cards.

Are you familiar with the Nutrition Facts Table?

If not, are you going to look for them the next time you are in the grocery store? And, if you are familiar, do you use the table to make more nutritious choices for you and your family?  

 

Comments

  1. I’m familiar with the nutrition facts table but I also take into account what the first 5 ingredients are in a product. I like to make an informed decision in the store before buying packaged goods so I know I’m making a good food choice for my family.
    Laura recently posted…How To Be The Best Mom On A Budget: My Top TipsMy Profile

  2. Knowledge is power! I really am glad that we have access to this information. It makes a huge difference when choosing what I feed my family

  3. I use the facts all the time and have taught my girls how they work. They ended up learning about them this year anyways which is good. Brought home homework for it and everything. I’m glad they are teaching this in school.
    Kathleen recently posted…The Difference Between Angry and MadMy Profile

  4. My daughter and I both read the Nutrition Facts Table all the time. This is one initiative that I feel is working extremely well in Ontario schools too. I know the curriculum now encourages kids to read the NFT and be discerning about what they eat and choose. I think my children are even better than I am at this often because I sometimes forget. So for instance this weekend I bought chocolate milk and didn’t check. I know dairy is good typically, low in sodium and it was on sale. Usually it is a safe bet. Anyways I bought without reading the label. Then my daughter and I had this heated chat about whether chocolate milk is good post workout. My husband also got in on it. So she read the NFT to us and I was a bit horrified by the sugars and the sodium. That’s not cool and why would sodium be high in chocolate milk?? Terrible. Anyways the kid was right but little does she know she shot herself in the foot because I will not buy that anymore based on the NFT!!!
    paula schuck recently posted…Healthy Habits to Get You Through the Winter #ChurchandDwightMy Profile

  5. This is an amazing program. I think more people need to learn what is in their foods and how to make healthy choices. When I was diagnosed with celiac disease it became imperative to read labels. It was only then that I began to realize how many food have hidden things in them and how the ones that I thought were good, really weren’t.
    Jennifer Van Huss recently posted…Return to ME time with Hallmark’s Latest Relaxation Trend #LoveHallmarkCAMy Profile

  6. LILLIAN BROWN says:

    I learned that Serving size is not necessarily the suggested quantity of food you should eat. The serving size tells you the quantity of food used to calculate the numbers in the nutrition facts table.

  7. Melissa Fowers says:

    I learned how important it is to read the labels!

  8. Amy Heffernan says:

    I learned how to read the fiber content in food. :) Thanks!

  9. Cheryl MacPhail says:

    I learned that you have to take note of the portion size when comparing products.

  10. Tara Betterley says:

    I learned that I need to better watch what I am eating. I never realized how important the labels were!

  11. Stephanie says:

    I learned how to read the nutrition facts and why it is important

  12. I learned how to read the labels. When I go shopping now I can grab healthier choices!

  13. I’ve been reading the labels for a long time. I like that they put the recommended daily percentage on there because that’s something that isn’t easy to figure out.

    Besos Sarah
    Journeys of The Zoo
    Sarah De Diego recently posted…Important Tips on How to be Prepared for WinterMy Profile

  14. Donna Wilson says:

    I’ve been eating very healthy the last couple of years, and always read the nutritional tables and ingredients thoroughly.

  15. you never know what you’re eating these days – especially when it comes to processed foods. thanks

  16. vanessa foster says:

    Im a label reader

  17. I learned that the Serving Size and the % Daily Value are listed on all Nutrition Facts tables.

  18. Julie bolduc says:

    I learnt that it is very important to read lables to have a healthy diet

  19. I learned that serving size is not always the suggested amount of food you should eat, it is the quantity of food used to calculate the numbers in the nutrition facts table

  20. Judy Cowan says:

    I learned that the serving size on the label is not what you should eat, it is just the quantity of food that they have used to determine the different values.

  21. Readingthe labels and nutritional info on products is really important to make sure you know what you are consuming. Thats what I learned.

  22. ivy pluchinsky says:

    I learnt how important that reading the labels is, and we need to know what we are putting in our bodies.

  23. Robyn Bellefleur says:

    I learned that understanding is just as important as reading the labels.

  24. Florence Cochrane says:

    I learned how to compare foods to help me choose healthier choices.

  25. Florence Cochrane says:

    I learned how to compare foods to help me choose healthier choices for myself and my family.

  26. Lynda Cook says:

    I learned how to properly read the facts and the difference between the fats and trans fats!!

  27. Simply making people aware that it is important as to what they are putting in their bodies. Manufacturers do not have your best interests at heart.

  28. I learned that I really need to read the serving size.

  29. I learned that the nutritional facts are based on the serving size listed – which is not necessarily how much/little you eat.

  30. I learned how to properly read nutritional labels on product.

  31. Serving size on the label isn’t necessarily the amount you should eat. Who knew!

  32. I learned to pay close attention to the serving size because it makes a big difference in the nutrition facts if you eat more lor less the size on the chart.

  33. Jenny Major says:

    I learned that Serving size is not necessarily the suggested quantity of food you should eat.

  34. I learned how the serving size and the nutrient information work together in the nutrition facts table.

  35. Michelle Policelli says:

    I learned how to properly read the nutrition labels.

  36. Carole Dube says:

    I’ve been reading the labels for a long time. What I need to learn is the ingredients, some I have no idea what the word mean! I avoid those.

  37. Marilyn M says:

    Everyone has to become more familiar with this info. I am making a bigger effort to check nutrition facts

  38. Juliee Fitze says:

    Reading labels is really important for watching for hidden sugars in foods. Trying to watch my weight so I read everything.

  39. Doris Calvert says:

    When I took a healthy food course I started reading labels and is an eye opener for sure! When I was in y 20s even there was no labels so glad they did this so we are in charge of what we put in our bodies.

  40. Rosanne Robinson says:

    It’s very important that we teach our children about eating healthy foods and reading the labels on the products that we purchase is the key to making informed decisions.
    I learned that the serving size on the label is not what you should eat, it is just the quantity of food that they’ve used, to determine the values displayed.

  41. Jennifer L. says:

    I learned that many foods can be called different names on labels, so if I want to avoid sodium I need to also look out for words like brown sugar and soy sauce!

  42. Tiffany M says:

    I learned that the serving size is not necessarily the amount you should eat. It makes sense!

  43. I learned that there are 13 core nutrients that must be included in the nutrition table.

  44. I can use the % Daily Value (% DV) to see if a Serving Size has a little or a lot of a nutrient.

  45. Marlene J says:

    To always take note of the portion size when comparing products

  46. I learnt that it is important to read and to understand food labels!

  47. kathy downey says:

    This is an amazing program i read nutrition facts table before i buy.we have a family member with salt restrictions and after learning how to read and understand the table i was shocked to find the amount of salt in our food and honestly it scared me.

  48. I learned 5% Daily Value or less is a little and 15% Daily Value or more is a lot of a nutrient.

  49. I learned you should start by looking at the serving size first.

  50. I learned that I should pay close attention to serving size!
    Cathleen @ A Taste of Madness recently posted…Chocolate Chip Cookie BarsMy Profile

  51. I’ve learned how important the serving size is. It’s often a lot smaller than you’d expect!

  52. that the label tells the serving size, not the package.

  53. I learned about the importance to understanding the nutritional values for our best health.
    The most important nutrients to watch for are:
    Calcium: Bone health
    Fiber: Intestinal health
    Vitamin C: Immune health
    Potassium: Heart health

  54. I learned there are 13 core ingredients on the label.

  55. Diana Powell says:

    I learned serving size is so important especially in portion control.

  56. Jennifer Neil says:

    To look at the portion size

  57. I watch my salt intake. the nutrition facts table helps me to stay on top of things!
    Glenda Wong recently posted…Focus on Family Roots {w/Giveaway & Twitter Party Info}My Profile

  58. Elva Roberts says:

    I learned to find out whether a food contained a lot of a little of a nutrient by its percentage of a serving for a day.

  59. Maria McLachlan says:

    Reading the labels helps us make healthier choices and my 8 yr old is even getting into reading them

  60. I learned to find out whether a food contained a lot of a little of a nutrient by its percentage of a serving for a day.

  61. I learned to find out whether a food contained a lot of a little of a nutrient by its percentage of a serving for a day.

  62. I learned about what is in a nutrition facts table and how to use it.

  63. I learned all about the nutrition facts table and I also learned how to use it.

  64. Tammy Harrison says:

    I learned about what food contained a little or a lot of something (fat, calories, sodium, etc).

  65. Doreen Lamoureux says:

    I learned to keep an eye on carbs

  66. Karla Sceviour says:

    I learned about serving sizes and how to read them.

  67. I learned that 5% Daily Value (DV) or less is a little and 15% DV or more is a lot for all nutrients in the Nutrition Facts table.

  68. I learned that I serving size isn’t necessarily the amount you should eat, it’s just for getting the nutritional numbers.

  69. I think it is really important to look at the serving size – for example crackers – it may be 6 crackers/serving. If you eat more, the sodium may be outtasite. Thanks for the chance.

  70. Ronald Gagnon says:

    I learned how important it is check the nutritious facts and vitamin/mineral/fats content on each purchase

  71. I learned that Serving size is not necessarily the suggested quantity of food you should eat. Information is powerful

  72. I scored perfectly on the quiz so I guess I already knew a lot of the facts? I am a pretty avid reader of the nutrition table on products, often choosing one over another because of lower sugar or salt content.

  73. Jennifer Lo says:

    I learned how to read the nutrition facts and why it is important for my family.

  74. nicolthepickle says:

    I learned that serving size isn’t always what you expect. Pay attention to how much it actually is.

  75. Lisa Neutel says:

    I learned how to read those labels and that it is very important to see whats in your food

  76. I learned about what qualifies as a lot or a little of a nutrient

  77. Anu Chopra says:

    I learned that the nutrition facts table gives you information on:

    serving size
    calories
    % DV (daily value)

  78. Debbie S. says:

    I learned that 15% DV or more is a lot for all nutrients in the Nutrition Facts table, whether it be a goo thing or a not so good thing.

  79. laura feist says:

    how to determin the nutrition

  80. Sherri Ford says:

    I learned that a serving size varies with different products.

  81. Not sure my previous comment showed up. I have learned the importance of serving sizes!

  82. Carol McCann says:

    having this nutritional information available is a great way to improve your health

  83. Carol McCann says:

    having this nutritional information available is a great way to improve your health read read the labels

  84. Brenda Lacourciere says:

    I learned how important it is to read the labels. I need to cut back on salt and the labels make it easier to shop for low sodium products.

  85. Angela Mitchell says:

    I use the nutrition facts table all the time. I’m hypoglycemic so I always need to watch for sugar. I like how the table makes it easy to compare two products.

  86. I learned how to correctly read labels!

  87. I learned about how important it is to look at more then just the calories. Sodium can really shock you also serving size!

  88. I learned how to read the labels!

  89. Lisa McLain says:

    wow great artical i learned about label readings and that sodium is in alot of our foods

  90. Debbie White Beattie says:

    By checking a product’s serving size, you can: 1. understand how much of a nutrient you are eating 2. compare calories and nutrients between 2 similar packaged food products 3. compare it to the amount you actually eat

  91. It’s definitely a good habit to get into checking the Nutritional facts!

  92. crystal porter says:

    I learned to pay attention to portion size and to modify the percentages based on the number of portions I’ve had.

  93. I’ve learned to watch for hidden sugars in foods!

  94. Anne Taylor says:

    I have been checking the nutrition guides on every product that has a label! Looking at the sodium content and fat are ones that matter to me the most!

  95. Michelle W says:

    I learned how to read the labels

  96. I learned to “Use % Daily Value (%DV) to see if a Serving Size has a little or a lot of nutrients.
    5% DV or less is a little
    15% DV or more is a lot”

  97. kristen visser says:

    I absolutely love that they have this and helping people to gain knowledge of the ingredients in the products they are purchasing. My husband and I started to really pay attention about 6 months ago when we realized something we were giving our daughter wasn’t that great and full of lots of sodium. So now we know to really pay attention and read labels before we buy

  98. Brenda Witherspoon-Bedard says:

    I learned how to properly read the label

  99. I learned that you should pay attention to the serving size when comparing two items.

  100. I learnt that it’s important to read and understand the label..great eye opener for sure

  101. Christine D says:

    I learned 5% DV or less is a little and 15% or more is a lot. I really didn’t understand it before reading this, thank you for explaining

  102. Karen E Hill says:

    I learned to make sure and check the serving size for the nutritional facts displayed

  103. Harvinderks says:

    I learned it’s important to look at the nutrition label and understand the values.

  104. I learned that the percent of the daily value can tell you whether a nutrient has a little (5% or less) or a lot (15% or more).

  105. mohammad anjum says:

    checking the nutrition guides on every product

  106. I’m pretty familiar with nutrition labels, but it’s good to be reminded that a serving size isn’t always the amount I actually eat,

  107. I learned how to use the guide by reading the % DV (Daily Value). 5% DV or less is a little and 15% DV+ is a lot for all nutrients in the Nutrition Facts table. So if a product you’re eating has a high sodium content, make sure to minimize sodium in your other foods for the rest of the day.

  108. ashleigh swerdfeger says:

    I learned that some vitamins don’t have to be included in the fact table. I like how it is more informative!

  109. Deturming the nutritional value in each product

  110. Caryn Coates says:

    I learned that reading labels is really important

  111. Darwin Chau says:

    I learned that you really have to compare the numbers to the serving size otherwise it’ll throw the nuturitional values off!

  112. I learned you need to look at serving size not the amount you eat to determine the correct nutrition

  113. nicoleroannef says:

    i learned how to compare food products using the nutrition facts table

  114. I learned that 5% Daily Value (DV) or less is a little and 15% DV or more is a lot for all nutrients in the Nutrition Facts table.

  115. I learned that serving size is very critical to remember when looking at DV as it can easily be not what you consume!

  116. I pay attention to where the product is produced, and try to purchase products made in Canada

  117. A good reminder for me about fat content of Cheddar versus Cottage Cheese > in fact I haven’t bought Cottage Cheese for ages and now I have a craving for it Ha!

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